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Scientists shed light on how the body defends against tuberculosis infection

Scientists shed light on how the body defends against tuberculosis infection

A new study has provided an insight into how immune systems react when infected with tuberculosis (TB). The researchers believe this could help to develop new treatments for the condition in the future.

The research, published in the journal, Cell Host & Microbe, looked at how the immune systems of mice reacted when they were infected with TB.

The scientists found that a particular enzyme in the immune system, known as cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS), seemed to be key in protecting the body from the TB bacteria.

When mice without the cGAS enzyme were infected with TB, their bodies gave way to the condition much more quickly.

The researchers believe that this finding has the potential for developing new therapies to treat TB using the immune system. Further studies are now needed to test whether this could work for people with the condition.

Read the original news story.

Read the abstract of the journal article.

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